Life after lockdown: how do we best recover from the pandemic?

2021 saw record temperatures and deaths from natural disasters, NASA, NOAA reveal

2021 was another record-setting year, ranking as the sixth hottest year on record. Following a trend, these past eight years have also been the eight hottest years on record, experts revealed Thursday (Jan. 13).

“Some of the events this year were probably not even possible without global warming, or at least they were made much worse by it.”

Russel Voss, scientist, NOAA

In an annual call to discuss climate change and the year’s climate data, experts from NASA and NOAA (the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) shared today that 2021 was the sixth-warmest year for Earth since records began in 1880. And the past eight years have all set such records. But warming temperatures mean more than just hotter summer days…READ ON

Life will deliver hardship, that's guaranteed. How you deal with it is the variable that changes everything.(antoniodiaz/Shutterstock)
Life will deliver hardship, that’s guaranteed. How you deal with it is the variable that changes everything.(antoniodiaz/Shutterstock) Full Story: Embracing the Art of Resilience in 2022

Life after lockdown: how do we best recover from the pandemic?

It was October 2020 when I realised I was going to have to ask for help. I’ve always been anxious, but thanks to the pandemic, I developed debilitating health anxiety. A dire winter was coming and any respite we’d had over the summer felt like it was slipping away. I couldn’t get to sleep and when I finally did, I had nightmares. My stomach churned and my hands shook so badly I had to give up caffeine. I developed a chronic reflux cough and, on more than one occasion, got into such an irrational spiral about it being Covid that I had to book a PCR test just to be able to function.

‘One of the most diabolical things about this pandemic is the on and on-ness of it all’

Amanda Ripley, Author

“One of the most diabolical things about this pandemic is the on and on-ness of it all,” says Amanda Ripley, author of The Unthinkable: Who Survives When Disaster Strikes – and Why. “Humans can withstand a lot of turmoil and instability if they can recover.” Prior to Covid, Ripley studied people who survived tornadoes and terror attacks, emergencies for which the mental health consequences are much better understood than the long, slow-burn, seemingly endless one we find ourselves living through…READ ON

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