Recognizing the Strength and Resilience of Native Americans

New mapping shows how climate change could flood low-lying areas in Vancouver and beyond

The maps, created by engineering professor Slobodan Simonovic, are a visual distillation of almost 150,000 reference documents — including current and historical rainfall and snow-melt runoff data, topographic analyses, urbanization factors that impede effective drainage and a range of climate projections.

Low-lying areas of major cities like Vancouver and Montreal could become inundated with floods in the next 80 years under various climate change scenarios.

Simonovic superimposed the data on web-based maps to show potential future flood inundation — how much of an area is covered by water — as well as how often and how significant floods could be.

The maps, which show flood impacts on a Canada-wide scale in a standardized way, identify areas where rivers are most likely to overflow, including the Assiniboine and Red rivers that converge on Winnipeg and the Fraser Valley that runs through Vancouver…READ ON

Recognizing the Strength and Resilience of Native Americans

November is Native American Heritage Month, a period to honor the communities within the more than 570 federally recognized tribes in the United States and their traditions.

Designed by Seminole-Choctaw artist Brian Larney

As a proud Native American from a Mohawk family, I’m especially honored to celebrate our community through our theme “Woven with Strength and Resilience,” as we look to reflect on the strength it’s taken to achieve progress in our community and our continued resilience to address the many issues we still face today.

“Thanks to my grandmother and my family’s encouragement, I found my opportunity to become the first person in our family to graduate from college. I then went on to get my law degree which led me to the opportunity to eventually become a Vice President at a great company like AT&T.”

Tom Brooks, AT&T Vice President of Professional Services and Operations, E&LA

Health disparities, protecting sacred lands, and the ongoing crisis of missing and murdered Indigenous peoples are some of the systemic challenges these communities are facing…READ ON

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