Medicanes Might Follow Fires, Bringing More Devastation in Greece

Medicanes Might Follow Fires, Bringing More Devastation in Greece

Following August’s catastrophic fires in Greece, scientists are warning of floods in the affected areas that could bring more devastation if a “medicane” hits.

“The Mediterranean is becoming the saltiest and fastest-warming sea on the planet.”

A medicane is a tropical-like cyclone originating in the Mediterranean. The weather phenomenon devasted parts of Greece in September 2020. After receiving various names from different meteorological centers, the storm, dubbed Ianos by the METEO unit of the National Observatory of Athens, rapidly intensified while moving northeastward.

After hitting Italy, the storm went on to strike Malta and Crete with tropical storm-force winds. Despite land interaction, the small cyclone reached its peak intensity of 120 km/h (75 mph) on September 18, immediately before making landfall in southwestern Greece. After landfall, Ianos turned back out to sea and moved south-southeastward, before dissipating on September 21…READ ON

Earthquake swarm detected at Hawaii volcano

Geologists have said they detected a swarm of earthquakes at Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano, though it is not erupting.

Kilauea: one of the world’s most active volcanoes, having erupted 34 times since 1952.

The quakes began overnight and continued into the morning, the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory said.  More than 140 earthquakes were recorded as of 4.30am local time.  The largest was magnitude 3.3, while most were less than magnitude 1.

At the same time as the swarm, scientists recorded changes to the ground surface of the volcano.

That may indicate magma was moving beneath the south part of Kilauea’s caldera, the observatory said.

There has been no evidence of lava at the surface. The observatory changed its volcano alert level to watch from advisory, meaning Kilauea is showing heightened or escalating unrest with more potential for an eruption…READ ON

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