Here’s How Scientists Predict the Next Hurricane Season

India: Mass evacuations as Cyclone Yaas set to hit eastern region

India is bracing for its second cyclone in a week as officials in two eastern states ordered mass evacuations. The country’s hospitals are already under strain from a spike in COVID-19 cases.

India was preparing to be hit by its second cyclone in a week on Monday as officials in two states ordered mass evacuations. Authorities in West Bengal and Odisha told nearly half a million people to leave their homes as Cyclone Yaas headed toward the east of the country.

“Our target is to ensure that not a single life is lost,” said Bankim Hazra, a minister in West Bengal state…

Here’s How Scientists Predict the Next Hurricane Season

As summer in the Northern Hemisphere approaches, forecasters begin watching every bout of rainy weather between the Gulf of Mexico and Africa. Each counterclockwise swirl of wind or burst of puffy clouds there has the potential to organize into a life-threatening tropical storm.

The seeds of tropical storms are small and hardly menacing weather disturbances. The vast majority of these seeds do not survive beyond a few days, but some are swept up by the easterly airflow to be planted over the tropical Atlantic Ocean.

About half of the tropical storms that formed over the past two decades grew into hurricanes, and about half of those became the monsters of coastal destruction we call major hurricanes. We’re now accustomed to seeing about 16 tropical storms per year, though that number can vary quite a bit year to year.

What are the warning signs that we might be in for another record Atlantic hurricane season like 2020, when 30 tropical storms formed, or a quieter one like 2014, with just eight…

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