The Pandemic Has Left Us All a Little Depleted, but These 50 Tips for Building Resilience Can Help

‘Natural disasters’ increase triggers for violence against women and girls

‘Natural disasters,’ sparked by climate change and other natural hazards, increase the triggers for violence against women and girls by boosting the means, opportunity, and underlying drivers, finds a review of the available evidence, published in the online journal BMJ Global Health.

As populations are increasingly affected by climate-related disasters and [violence against women and girls] can have severe and lasting health impacts

As these disasters are increasing in frequency, severity, and duration worldwide, this consequence must now be formally recognised in public health, violence prevention, and disaster management strategies, urge the researchers.

Over the past two decades, 7348 disasters precipitated by natural hazards were recorded. This is nearly double the number recorded between 1980 and 1999. And between 2008 and 2017, most (84%) of all recorded disasters were related to climate issues.

The researchers base their conclusions on a systematic review of the available published evidence, looking at the association between disasters from natural hazards and violence against women and girls…

The Pandemic Has Left Us All a Little Depleted, but These 50 Tips for Building Resilience Can Help

The Pandemic Has Left Us All a Little Depleted, but These 50 Tips for Building Resilience Can Help

Is your narrative positive or negative? The former will encourage you to move forward, while the latter will keep you stuck

This past year has been hard on everyone, affecting us personally and professionally in ways we never imagined. And during such scary and uncertain times, staying positive was easier said than done. With stress and anxiety at an all-time high, there’s no denying the pandemic tested our inner strength and resilience.

Research confirms it: According to a recent survey conducted by Parade in collaboration with the Cleveland Clinic, 27% of people have less confidence in their own resilience in challenging times compared to before the pandemic.

So, what is resilience, exactly?

“Resilience is our ability to quickly recover from challenges in our own lives, and is closely connected to the people and communities that surround us, from family and school environments to the workplace,” says Dr. Doug Nemecek, MD, MBA, chief medical officer for behavioral health at Cigna. “Resilience is a skill that can be built over time and with practice. Someone with high resilience has a robust set of personal qualities that allow them to take on stressful situations…

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