87% of supply chain professionals plan to invest in resilience within 2 years

87% of supply chain professionals plan to invest in resilience within 2 years

A global survey by analyst company Gartner of more than 1,300 supply chain professionals found that 87% of respondents plan investments in supply chain resiliency within the next two years. The survey, conducted from September 2020 through November 2020, showed that even more supply chain professionals (89%) want to invest in agility.

However, cost remains a priority, challenging chief supply chain officers (CSCOs) to find a new balance between resiliency, cost-efficiency and fulfilling increasing customer demands.

45% of survey respondents think that their customers favor low pricing over domestic sourcing and production

“Supply chain executives overwhelmingly recognize the necessity to make their networks more resilient and agile,” said Geraint John, vice president analyst with the Gartner Supply Chain practice. “At the same time, 60% admit that their supply chains have not been designed for resilience, but cost-efficiency The challenge will be to create an operating model for supply chains that combines the best of both worlds and also delivers supreme customer service.”

Gartner defines resilience as the ability to adapt to structural changes by modifying supply chain strategies, products and technologies, and agility as the ability to sense and respond to unanticipated changes in demand or supply quickly and reliably, without sacrificing cost or quality…

One Way to Build More Resilient Medical Supply Chains in the U.S.

The search for supply chain efficiencies has made our health care system leaner and more global. But this efficiency has come at the cost of resilience, with hospitals and health care providers now dependent on fragile global supply chains vulnerable to disruptions from “black swan” events like Covid-19.

“The pandemic demonstrated the devastating human and economic costs of this fragility”

The pandemic demonstrated the devastating human and economic costs of this fragility: soaring prices and widespread shortages of critical medical supplies and personal protective equipment (PPE), and health care facilities struggling to protect staff and patients. The shortages also unleashed a homegrown resource that helped us cope: the tens of thousands of domestic manufacturers and community groups who stepped up to produce PPE and other critical supplies when existing supply chains failed…

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s