Harvard professor: 5 activities can increase your happiness fast, and they’re free

Harvard professor: 5 activities can increase your happiness fast, and they’re free

Day to day, especially during economically strained times like the coronavirus pandemic, it’s easy to prioritize having and making money above everything else.

But Ashley Whillans, assistant professor of business administration at Harvard Business School and author of “Time Smart,” has found that valuing time over money — even for just a few minutes a day — leads to an increase in happiness and well-being.

[Research shows] over and over again that people who prioritize time report greater happiness than people who prioritize money.

Ashley Whillans – AUTHOR, ‘TIME SMART’

The research shows “over and over again that people who prioritize time report greater happiness than people who prioritize money,” says Whillans. And “there are small strategies that we can all take, regardless of our station in life, regardless of our financial goals, that don’t involve much time, maybe don’t even involve any money, but can help all of us live a happier, more meaningful, and less stressed out life.”…

17th-Century England Had Some Seriously Horrible Weather

Thames Frost Fair, 1683–84, by Thomas Wyke

Recent years have brought record-breaking wildfires, hurricanes, and other natural disasters supercharged by climate change. But even to our jaded modern eyes, the weather that befell Bristol in Western England at the turn of 17th century is pretty shocking.

Studying past weather can lead to plenty of insights into life at the time, as well as how historical events might have gone differently had the wind blown a different way, so to speak. 

Isaac Schultz

The meteorological situation in Bristol occurred during a short timespan within the Little Ice Age called the Grindelwald Fluctuation, so named for the expansion of a Swiss glacier by the same name. A team of researchers from the University of Bristol and University College London recently inspected Tudor-era chronicles describing the weather phenomena, which included huge floods, snowstorms, frigid temperatures, and storms. Their findings are published in the Royal Meteorological Society journal Weather…

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