resilience reporter

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How The ‘Lost Art’ Of Breathing Can Impact Sleep And Resilience

Building for a flooded future: Architects are designing for the new climate reality

limate change is making cities more susceptible to flooding. According to a 2019 study, global sea levels are expected to rise between two and seven feet over the course of the century; by 2100, at least 190 million people could be living in areas below the projected high-tide line.

“If our findings stand, coastal communities worldwide must prepare themselves for much more difficult futures than may be currently anticipated,” the study warned.

Separate research concluded that if the world does nothing to mitigate sea level rise, coastal flooding could cause damage worth up to 20% of global gross domestic product by 2100.

The threat of flooding is changing the way cities are built, and architects are adapting their designs to a new climate reality…

How The ‘Lost Art’ Of Breathing Can Impact Sleep And Resilience

Breathing slowly and deeply through the nose is associated with a relaxation response, says James Nestor, author of Breath. As the diaphragm lowers, you’re allowing more air into your lungs and your body switches to a more relaxed state.

Humans typically take about 25,000 breaths per day — often without a second thought. But the COVID-19 pandemic has put a new spotlight on respiratory illnesses and the breaths we so often take for granted.

Journalist James Nestor became interested in the respiratory system years ago after his doctor recommended he take a breathing class to help his recurring pneumonia and bronchitis.

While researching the science and culture of breathing for his new book, Breath: The New Science of a Lost Art, Nestor participated in a study in which his nose was completely plugged for 10 days, forcing him to breathe solely through his mouth. It was not a pleasant experience…

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