resilience reporter

resilience starts with information

These Incredible Pictures Show The Wrath Of Hurricane Sally

How to Think about Existential Threats
Clouds gather but produce no rain as cracks are seen in the dried up municipal dam in drought-stricken Graaff-Reinet, South Africa, November 14, 2019. Picture taken November 14, 2019. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY Full story: https://www.nationalreview.com/magazine/2020/09/21/how-to-think-about-existential-threats/

Resilience is missing for many employees

A new report from Aon,examined the views of employers and employees across five major countries in Europe and claim that just 30 percent of employees are resilient while also suggesting that resilience can triple when employers adopt a well-rounded programme of support. Employees with poor resilience have 55 percent lower engagement at work and are 42 percent less likely to want to stay with their employer. In the UK, 29 percent of employees are resilient, and those with poor resilience have 59 percent lower engagement and are 43 percent less likely to want to stay with their employer…

After the floods, assessing Hurricane Sally’s damage

As an Alabama resident, Toby Wallace has seen his fair share of hurricane damage working for the U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency, where he handles flood insurance claims.

But that did not prepare him for Hurricane Sally, which flipped his camper and pushed it into his Gulf Shores home, breaking off the front steps. High winds drove water through the vents and roof, flooding a room.

“It’s gonna be a lot of cleaning,” said Wallace, 49.

Wallace and thousands of other residents along the U.S. Gulf Coast are just starting to tally the damage from Hurricane Sally, which could come in anywhere from $8 billion to $10 billion, well above earlier estimates of $2 billion to $3 billion, said Chuck Watson of Enki Research, which tracks tropical storms and models the cost of their damage…

These Incredible Pictures Show The Wrath Of Hurricane Sally

Hurricane Sally made landfall as a Category 2 storm on Wednesday, quickly downgrading to a tropical depression but still dropping over 30 inches of rain in parts of Pensacola, Florida. Hundreds required rescuing from the floodwaters, and the high winds tore off roofs and knocked out power for many. More flooding is possible over the weekend in Virginia and Maryland as the storm moves.

More than 20 storms have been named this hurricane season, and there are still two months left to go. A few weeks ago, Hurricane Laura made landfall as a Category 4 storm in Louisiana and Texas…

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