resilience reporter

resilience starts with information

Japanese Health Manual Created During the 1918 Spanish Flu Pandemic Offers Timeless Wisdom

Japan Heatwave Kills 79 and Sends Over 6,000 to the Hospital

Extreme summer heat in Japan has killed 79 people in the capital of Tokyo over the past month and led to record temperatures in the central city of Hamamatsu.

Japanese national broadcaster NHK said on Tuesday, August 18, that 79 people in the capital have died so far in August from heatstroke. About 80 percent of the victims were aged 70 or older.

NHK said that this month’s soaring temperatures were particularly difficult for the country’s elderly population after a prolonged rainy season.

On Monday, August 17, the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) said that temperatures rose to 41.1 degrees Celsius (105.9 degrees Fahrenheit) in the central city of Hamamatsu in the Shizuoka Prefecture. In 2018, the city of Kumagaya in the central Saitama Prefecture also saw a record high temperature of 41.1 degrees Celsius—tied for the highest-ever temperature recorded in Japan…

 

Japanese Health Manual Created During the 1918 Spanish Flu Pandemic Offers Timeless Wisdom: Stay Away from Others, Cover Your Mouth & Nose, and More

Japan-pandemic-manual

By the time the Spanish Flu had burned its way through the population of Japan it would leave behind nearly half a million dead.

 

In August of 1918, a group of sumo wrestlers returned to Japan from an exhibition in Taiwan. When they came down with an illness it was first diagnosed as bronchitis or pneumonia. In fact, they had returned with the Spanish Flu.

The “Sumo Flu,” as it was first called by some in the Japanese press, was not taken as seriously as the more prevalent cholera, which had a higher death rate at the time. But cholera was not as infectious. By the time the Spanish Flu had burned its way through the population of Japan it would leave behind nearly half a million dead, either from the flu itself or secondary health complications…

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Information

This entry was posted on 28/08/2020 by in Uncategorized and tagged , .

MORE RESOURCES

MORE RESOURCES

%d bloggers like this: