resilience reporter

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What is COVID-19 doing to our mental health?

Should you consider “natural disasters” when looking for a home?

Location is one of the biggest considerations Australians typically take note of when buying a home, but with recent events such as the bushfires and flooding, is it also wise to consider natural disasters?

Simon Pressley, head of research at Propertyology, said property investors who worry about the potential natural disasters “should probably not bother investing at all.” “The odds of your property being significantly damaged or destroyed by a kitchen fire or major water leak are probably higher than totally avoiding natural disasters,” he said.

Pressley believes that while it is okay to take extra precautions when buying a home, it is not a smart move to ultimately base a decision on the likelihood of a natural disaster happening in a certain location…

 

The coronavirus is an endurance test with no clear end

coronavirus2

Hurricane Katrina killed more than 1,800 people and cost an estimated $161 billion in current dollars, making it the most expensive natural disaster in U.S. history. But those affected could find safety and aid outside the disaster area, and America’s economy barely experienced a blip. Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Two aspects make the COVID-19 pandemic unlike any disaster we’ve experienced in memory: its global nature and its unknown duration.

Why it matters: As the coronavirus spreads across the country, we’ll need to fight a medical war on all fronts at the same time, stressing our ability to respond. And we may need to keep up that fight — and the disruptive social distancing accompanying it — for months or longer.

Background: It’s tempting to search for historical precedents, like 9/11 or Hurricane Katrina.

But as much as the morning of Sept. 11 shifted the course of history, most Americans were directly untouched by the attack and its aftermath. A month after 9/11, U.S. stock markets had regained their pre-attack levels.

Hurricane Katrina killed more than 1,800 people and cost an estimated $161 billion in current dollars, making it the most expensive natural disaster in U.S. history. But those affected could find safety and aid outside the disaster area, and America’s economy barely experienced a blip…

 

What is COVID-19 doing to our mental health?

Australians are faced this week with a ban on attending sports events, theatre, even the movies.

It may seem trite to say that being banned from attending such popular social recreational events on top of already existing self-isolation and quarantine instructions is catastrophic, but these necessary restrictions will have short and potentially long-term mental health impacts.

As a result of coronavirus (COVID-19) we are facing a pandemic.  The direct and secondary consequences are unfolding on a daily basis in ways we have not seen for generations.

We have exceptionally talented scientists working on optimal strategies for containment and cure, and we are hopeful of a breakthrough in either one, ideally both…

 

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This entry was posted on 20/03/2020 by in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , .

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