resilience reporter

resilience starts with information

Holidaying in a disaster zone isn’t as crazy as it might seem

How Australia’s massive bushfires are generating thunderstorms

australia-cloud-nasa

Big natural disasters can create their own weather systems. The Australian bushfires are now so intense that they’re starting to make thunderstorms. Image (NASA): Smoke rising from Australia’s fires on Jan. 4, 2020.

Big natural disasters can create their own weather systems. The Australian bushfires are now so intense that they’re starting to make thunderstorms. On Jan. 3, Australia’s meteorology bureau issued a severe thunderstorm warning for East Gippsland in Victoria. The thunderstorm condition is also happening in New South Wales, another state with intense fires and smoke. Essentially, when hot air and smoke from bushfires rises and meets cool air from the atmosphere, it turns into pyrocumulus clouds, also known as “fire clouds.” These rare and dangerous clouds form fast and move quickly, creating gusty winds and thunderstorms…

 

Australian bushfire: How social media provided the world with a window to the crisis

As fires rage across three Australian states, devastating towns, businesses and the lives of the people that support them, helpless onlookers have taken to social media to express their grief and to illustrate the crisis.

Here is a collection of Tweets spanning the affected states that highlight our nation’s response to one of the worst natural disasters we have faced…

 

Holidaying in a disaster zone isn’t as crazy as it might seem

Holidaying in a disaster zone might seem crazy, but “volunteer tourism” can actually help communities recover from natural disasters.

And if can offer a unique and rewarding experience for volunteers, if done carefully.

When disaster hits a tourist destination – whether fire, flood, cyclone or earthquake – tourists usually stay away, leaving communities to deal with a loss of income on top of the costs of repair and recovery.

On the other hand, people who feel a natural curiosity, as well as a natural desire to help, are keen for experiences where they can interact with locals and make a difference.

This “volunteer tourism” should not be confused with “disaster tourism” in which tourists immediately travel to a scene not to help but to look…

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

MORE RESOURCES

MORE RESOURCES

%d bloggers like this: