resilience reporter

resilience starts with information

The 10 Most Unforgettable Weather Disasters of the 2010s

Nature-based climate solutions go beyond planting trees

nature based climate solutions

Excessive reliance on planting trees is risky. Fires can quickly release stored forest carbon

Rumour has it that the federal government is considering a major investment in using nature to reduce greenhouse gases and to mitigate climate change.

The UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Climate Change and Land has numerous helpful suggestions in this regard.

The IPCC says that protecting existing high-carbon ecosystems (wetlands, rangelands, forests) has immediate impacts. Canada, with some of the world’s largest expanses of intact forests and wetlands, can play a globally significant role in this regard.

Recent research indicates that the Hudson Bay Lowlands, the world’s largest continuous expanse of peatlands, can continue to provide a carbon sink even under rapid warming. Peat represents an early stage of coal formation. Conserving peat helps offset the effects of mining and burning coal — a major contributor to the current climate emergency…

 

The 10 Most Unforgettable Weather Disasters of the 2010s

As the 2010s come to a close, it’s hard to believe the number of major weather disasters we’ve seen this decade in the U.S.

Droughts, floods, tornado outbreaks, hurricanes, winter storms and wildfires have all taken their toll on the nation this decade.

Through October 2019, NOAA’s National Centers For Environmental Information compiled 115 weather events from 2010 through 2019 each responsible for at least $1 billion damage in the U.S.

From that list, we ranked the top 10 most unforgettable weather stories of the decade, ranked not simply by the magnitude of their impacts at the time, but also their effects lingering for months or years after.

Climate change influenced at least two of these events and is a top story no matter the list because of its implication for future weather disasters. But we will stick to individual weather events for the purposes of this piece…

 

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