resilience reporter

resilience starts with information

NASA space data can cut disaster response times, costs

 

Improving India–Japan disaster response after Typhoon Hagibis

Typhoon Hagibis pummelled Japan’s main island Honshu in October 2019, crippling everyday life in the region. The Japanese Cabinet designated Typhoon Hagibis a ‘severe’ and ‘extraordinary’ disaster. The wind gust was so strong it toppled a cargo ship in Tokyo Bay, killing five people on board. So far 88 people have died as a result of the typhoon and seven people are still missing…

 

Coastal flooding could cost Jamaica US$136 million annually

The report, titled Forces of Nature — Assessment and Economic Valuation of Coastal Protection Services Provided by Mangroves in Jamaica, presented evidence to show the importance of mangroves in flood risk reduction and saving Jamaica billions of dollars in damage to coastal infrastructure.

According to the study, mangrove forests in Jamaica provide over US$32.7 million in annual flood reduction benefits. This works out to more than US$2,500 per hectare each year, representing nearly 24 per cent of annual reduction in flood risk..

 

NASA space data can cut disaster response times, costs

3-nasaprepares

Ready access to this information could have saved an average of nine minutes per emergency response

According to a new study, emergency responders could cut costs and save time by using near-real-time satellite data along with other decision-making tools after a flooding disaster.

In the first NASA study to calculate the value of using satellite data in disaster scenarios, researchers at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, calculated the time that could have been saved if ambulance drivers and other emergency responders had near-real-time information about flooded roads, using the 2011 Southeast Asian floods as a case study. Ready access to this information could have saved an average of nine minutes per emergency response and potential millions of dollars, they said…

 

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