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The 21st Century Corporation’s Competitive Edge: Building Stress Resilience

7 ways Hurricane Sandy started a tidal wave of resilience

sandy

7 ways Hurricane Sandy started a tidal wave of resilience Image: Using oyster castles to build a living shoreline at Gandy’s Beach in New Jersey. Credit: Mary Conti/TNC

It’s been 7 years since Hurricane Sandy ransacked the East Coast. And, while bigger storms — with even more devastating impacts — have certainly come along, Sandy was unique because it helped start a movement toward resilience and nature-based solutions.

What does this mean?

In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, the U.S. Department of the Interior did something unusual — it provided more than $300 million in funding for resilience projects. Not just recovery — the building-back of damaged areas or the clean-up of debris — but the strengthening and restoration of vital natural systems like marshes, wetlands and rivers that can actually help protect people and wildlife from storm impacts…

 

The 21st Century Corporation’s Competitive Edge: Building Stress Resilience

Burnout is the hidden and costly crisis in today’s corporate culture, and it’s making headlines all over the world. While people are beginning to understand the personal, human downside of chronic stress and burnout, we are not fully comprehending the universal detriment to the modern corporation. Burnout is costly, with a $300 billion annual revenue loss in the U.S, alone due to absenteeism, sickness, accidents and mistakes attributed to chronic stress. The stakes are already extreme, and companies will continue to experience high turnover and loss of human capital as the pace of change continues to accelerate. Innovative and future-focused companies are adapting to better support and empower their colleagues with the work skills and healthy habits they need to succeed both in business and in life. This comprehensive skill set is the competitive edge corporations need to compete in the 21st century economy…

 

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