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Why Typhoon Hagibis packed such a deadly, devastating punch in Japan

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Typhoon Hagibis

 

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Japan Questions Flooding Defenses After Severe Weekend Typhoon

apan on Tuesday was questioning its defenses against flooding after a larger-than-expected toll from a weekend typhoon, which caused more than 180 rivers to overflow or break their banks.

Although Tokyo and other large cities were mostly spared major damage, floods hit dozens of rural communities across a band hundreds of miles long. Typhoon Hagibis, which hit late Saturday and early Sunday, killed 74 people and left 12 missing, public broadcaster NHK said. The government’s official death toll, which has trailed media…

 

Why Typhoon Hagibis packed such a deadly, devastating punch in Japan

Typhoon Hagibis proved to be extraordinarily devastating for northern Japan when it struck this weekend, unleashing more than three feet of rain in just 24 hours in some locations, causing widespread flash flooding as well as river flooding. The storm has killed at least 58, according to the Japanese public broadcaster NHK.

In addition, high winds lashed Tokyo and Tokyo Bay, along with pounding surf and storm surge flooding as the storm, once a Category 5 behemoth, barreled across Honshu as the equivalent of a Category 2 and then a Category 1-equivalent storm.

One reason the storm caused such severe impacts is that the inner core of the typhoon, with its heaviest rains and highest winds, remained intact as it swept across Tokyo and dumped heavy rains across northeastern Japan as well. According to reporting from The Washington Post’s Simon Denyer, by Sunday, more than 20 rivers in central and northeastern Japan had burst their banks, flooding more than 1,000 homes in cities, towns and villages….

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This entry was posted on 17/10/2019 by in Uncategorized and tagged .

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