resilience reporter

resilience starts with information

A major river in Europe hit by drought could create economic havoc

Mississippi River flooding and Hurricane Barry could have inundated New Orleans. Here are four actions we need to take before that happens again.

The Bonnet Carré Spillway will finally close this week after two separate openings totaling an unprecedented 120 days. The spillway was built to protect New Orleans and surrounding parishes from Mississippi River flooding as part of the Mississippi River and Tributaries system designed after the Great Flood of 1927.

This comes on the heels of another first when, earlier this month, Hurricane Barry was the first tropical storm to make landfall while the Mississippi River was at flood stage. This one-two punch — tropical storm combined with high river — was previously only a nightmare scenario with the potential to send storm surge upriver, overtopping levees, inundating the city and surrounding region, and shutting down globally significant commerce…

 

Wildfires Rage in Central Portugal

PORTUGAL-FIRE

A firefighter tries to extinguish a wildfire in the village of Casais de Sao Bento on July 22, 2019. Image Credit: Patricia De Melo Moreira / AFP / Getty

Over the past few days in Portugal’s Castelo Branco region, strong winds and temperatures greater than 100 degrees Fahrenheit (38 degrees Celsius) have driven devastating wildfires through several villages, destroying structures and injuring 39 people. Nearly 2,000 firefighters worked to bring the three major fires largely under control, but authorities warned that hot and dry conditions could lead to more flare-ups. Below, images of the wildfires and of the residents, volunteers, and professionals working to minimize the damage…

 

A major river in Europe hit by drought could create economic havoc

A heatwave in Europe is causing low water levels on the River Rhine — one of the continent’s most important shipping routes — which could weigh further on Germany’s vulnerable economy, experts have told CNBC.

Last year, low water levels on the Rhine made parts of it unnavigable. This caused production to come to a halt in places, increased manufacturing costs and disrupted supply chains in the industrial heartland of Europe.

There are signs a repeat performance could happen this summer with high temperatures and a lack of rainfall meaning that cargo vessels cannot sail fully loaded on parts of the Rhine, according to Reuters. In turn, that could hit Germany’s economy that was dented by similar events in 2018…

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Information

This entry was posted on 04/08/2019 by in Uncategorized and tagged , , , .

MORE RESOURCES

MORE RESOURCES

%d bloggers like this: