resilience reporter

resilience starts with information

Climate change will soon create ‘superfires’ across Europe

Small Towns Fear They Are Unprepared For Future Climate-Driven Flooding

us cities

More precipitation fell in the continental U.S. in the 12 months ending in May 2019 than ever recorded. Records go back more than 120 years. Blue areas had more groundwater than usual for May. Orange and red areas had less. NASA Earth Observatory

It technically began last fall when Hurricane Florence swelled the Ohio River, but really it was all the unnamed storms that came after it — one after another after another, bringing rain on rain on rain across the central U.S. until the Mississippi River hit flood stage this winter.

Much of the Mississippi, and the massive tributaries that feed it, stayed flooded until June. That meant more than 140 days of cascading disasters for hundreds of small towns from Minnesota to Louisiana and catastrophic damage to ranch and farm communities that dot the Mississippi’s swollen branches…

 

Heatwave: think it’s hot in Europe? The human body is already close to thermal limits elsewhere

I am a scientist who researches climate hazards. This week I have published research on the potential for a catastrophic cyclone-heatwave combo in the global south. Yet over the past few days I have been approached by various media outlets to talk not about that hazard, but about the unfolding UK heatwave and climate change. It is always satisfying to respond to public interest around weather extremes, but there is a danger that key messages about extreme heat globally are not receiving enough airtime.

It is by now very well established that hot extremes are more likely in the changed climate we are living in. Yet there is a seemingly unquenchable thirst for this story to be retold every time the UK sweats. Narratives around such acute, local events detract from critical messages about the global challenges from extreme heat…

 

Climate change will soon create ‘superfires’ across Europe

Global conservation group World Wildlife Fund (WWF) warned on Thursday of the risks from new faster-spreading “superfires” in the wake of heatwaves and droughts that have been afflicting Europe in what many see as a symptom of climate change.

Although the Mediterranean is the area most affected by wildfires, traditionally wetter northern European countries have recently also struggled with huge forest blazes.

An average of 300,000 hectares (740,000 acres) of forest burn every year in Europe, European data show.

The report, released by WWF Spain, said the fires cost the continent an estimated 3 billion euros ($3.38 billion) annually.

Between 2017 and 2018, hard-to-extinguish superfires that were fanned by strong winds and phenomena such as updraft killed 225 people in Portugal, Greece and Spain, and are expected to worsen due to an inadequate allocation of resources and rising global temperatures….

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

MORE RESOURCES

MORE RESOURCES

%d bloggers like this: