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Climate change: Debate on resilience for cities

Does God cause natural disasters?

In one camp, theologians believe God created the world and set things in motion but is not active in the day-to-day realities of life on earth. An analogy often used in this line of thinking is one of God as a clockmaker. Once the clock is made and wound, the clockmaker may make minor changes but the clock largely runs on its own. In this sense, natural disasters would be the natural result of global weather patterns.

The other line of thinking believes God is very much active in the world and, therefore, natural disasters. Theologians in this camp believe a disaster is the result of human sin and God’s wrath. Televangelist Pat Robertson drew attention and criticism for this belief in 2005 after Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans and in 2010 after the earthquake in Haiti when he said the disasters were a sign of sin and punishment from God…

 

Climate change: Debate on resilience for cities

Chilling-climate-change-SDGs-640x480

Climate change implications in the physical world are more and more common and visible to the global public, but the social impacts of its manifestations are often underrated, particularly when discussing climate change adaptation. Featured image: Stock

Climate change implications in the physical world are more and more common and visible to the global public, but the social impacts of its manifestations are often underrated, particularly when discussing climate change adaptation.

As the social and economic disruptions caused by global warming give rise to new patterns of human activity, there is increasing research on the link between climate change and threats to state security and health.

The debate on Resilience, particularly focusing on adaptation, requires a broad view that includes not only the physical level but also considers the impacts on social and economic disruptions at the city level…

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