resilience reporter

resilience starts with information

$4.2 Trillion Can Be Saved by Investing in More Resilient Infrastructure

Record Floods and Trump’s Trade War Are Threatening to Make This Year a ‘Train Wreck’ for Corn Farmers

Midwest Flooding Threatens Planting Season For Many Farmers

Rain clouds pass over an unplanted farm field on May 29, 2019 near Emden, Illinois. Near-record rainfall in parts of Illinois has caused farmers to delay their Spring corn planting. According to the USDA as of May 26 only 35 percent of the state’s corn crop had been planted. By the same date in 2018 farmers in the state had 99 percent of the crop in the ground. As the deadline for planting nears, many farmers may be forced to leave their fields fallow. Illinois ranks number two behind Iowa in U.S. corn production. Scott Olson—Getty Images

A smartphone could fit in the space between James McCune’s index finger and thumb as the Illinois farmer describes the height of crops stunted by incessant rain and unseasonably cool weather.

“Corn’s not supposed to be this tall” in mid-June, McCune, who can trace his family’s farm roots as far back as 1857, said. “It’s supposed to be this tall,” as he gestures just below his waist.

Conditions and morale are so low in McCune’s area of northwestern Illinois, typically the second-biggest corn-producing state, that he organized a get-together Thursday evening at The Happy Spot, a restaurant and bar in Deer Grove, Whiteside County. About 125 farmers and others tied to the industry turned out for chicken and beer at the event, dubbed “prevent plant party,” in reference to acreage left unplanted this season.  “It’s going to be a train wreck,” McCune said…

 

$4.2 Trillion Can Be Saved by Investing in More Resilient Infrastructure

The net benefit on average of investing in more resilient infrastructure in low- and middle-income countries would be $4.2 trillion with $4 in benefit for each $1 invested, according to a new report from the World Bank and the Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery (GFDRR).

The report, Lifelines: The Resilient Infrastructure Opportunity, lays out a framework for understanding infrastructure resilience, that is the ability of infrastructure systems to function and meet users’ needs during and after a natural hazard. It examines four essential infrastructure systems: power, water and sanitation, transport, and telecommunications. Making them more resilient is critical, the report finds, not only to avoid costly repairs but also to minimize the wide-ranging consequences of natural disasters for the livelihoods and well-being of people. Outages or disruptions to power, water, communication and transport affect the productivity of firms, the incomes and jobs they provide, as well as directly impacting people’s quality of life, making it impossible for children to go to school or study, and contributing to the spread of water-borne diseases like cholera…

 

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