resilience reporter

resilience starts with information

Create A Personal Resilience Plan: 3 Steps To Higher Performance And Happiness

How to Build Organizational Resilience

Driven by exponential technological change and sociopolitical and economic uncertainty, the average lifespan of companies on the S&P Index is becoming shorter and more volatile. The pace of change is accelerating. Employers and workers are under immense stress to adapt to this quickly transforming economy, leading to greater concerns about exhaustion and burnout.

The fear of burnout means companies are increasingly aware that building resilience strategies for their leaders and employees will be key in navigating this market turbulence. Research shows that high levels of leadership resilience correlate with higher job satisfaction, organizational commitment and work engagement; but few companies fully understand just what resilience is or how best to cultivate it in their workplace. Rather, many employ decades-old management practices that are stubbornly out of touch with today’s workforce….

 

Create A Personal Resilience Plan: 3 Steps To Higher Performance And Happiness

resilience

“Just as it pays to build a development plan, it’s important to create a clear way to combat both reactivity and burnout. In our work, we advise clients to do so by building a three-part “resilience plan.” – Tony Schwartz and Emily Pines Image credit: Getty

When was the last time you hit send on a curt email and then instantly regretted it? Or perhaps you retreated from a difficult conversation, spending hours fuming internally instead of proactively addressing the situation?

If you’ve had either one of these experiences, you’re scarcely alone. In the face of relentlessly rising demand and always-on connectivity, we hear similar stories from clients across all levels and industries.

At one recent session we did with the senior leaders of a Fortune 500 company, we began by asking, “What’s the biggest personal barrier you face in leading more effectively?” The first person to answer summed it up simply: “Being too reactive.”

Constantly connected, juggling multiple tasks simultaneously, and…

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