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5G Networks Could Throw Weather Forecasting Into Chaos

How to build emergency preparedness and disaster resilience

Your organisation works hard to support your clients and community to live their lives to their best ability. What would happen to the people that rely on you if something was to happen that meant that your services were compromised or had to be discontinued for a period of time due to a disaster?

A study conducted by ACOSS found that most Community Services Organisations would be highly vulnerable and unprepared if faced with an extreme weather event or natural disaster. 50% believed that they would be unable to operate for at least a week if an extreme weather event severely damaged their service centres or offices and 25% believed that this damage could cause their service to close permanently.*

There are a number of resources that you can use to help your organisation be better prepared for an emergency, allowing you to continue to serve your community or re-open your services faster to support your clients in difficult times…

 

5G Networks Could Throw Weather Forecasting Into Chaos

science_goes-r

“5G wireless phones could reduce the accuracy of forecasts by 30 percent…that reduction would give coastal residents two or three fewer days to prepare for a hurricanes.” – Neil Jacobs, NOAA’s acting chief. Image: NOAA/Lockheed Martin

If you had a choice between a better, faster cell phone signal and an accurate weather forecast, which would you pick? That’s the question facing federal officials as they decide whether to auction off more of the wireless spectrum or heed meteorologists who say that such a move could throw US weather forecasting into chaos.

On Capitol Hill Thursday, NOAA’s acting chief, Neil Jacobs, said that interference from 5G wireless phones could reduce the accuracy of forecasts by 30 percent. That’s equivalent, he said, to the quality of weather predictions four decades ago. “If you look back in time to see when our forecast scale was roughly 30 percent less than today, it was 1980,” Jacobs told the House Subcommittee on the Environment.

That reduction would give coastal residents two or three fewer days to prepare for a hurricane, and it could lead to incorrect predictions of the storms’ final path to land, Jacobs said. “This is really important,” he told ranking…

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This entry was posted on 19/05/2019 by in Uncategorized and tagged , .

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