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Japan wants to boost the use of electric vehicles as a power source during natural disasters

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©PinonRoad/iStock/Getty Images Plus Can You Master The Disaster? Read on:

Japan wants to boost the use of electric vehicles as a power source during natural disasters

Japan, a country which frequently suffers natural calamities such as tsunamis, typhoons, and earthquakes—which can often paralyze energy supplies—is looking to further harness the power of batteries used in electric vehicles (EVs) during such disasters, local media reported (paywall) yesterday (Feb.20)

Nissan, which produces the Leaf, the world’s best-selling EV model, plans to hold an event in March to let people stay overnight in their cars and try using the electricity stored in their car batteries to simulate the experience of being in an emergency, according to Japanese newswire Jiji (link in Japanese). A fully charged electric vehicle can supply power to a standard home for up to four days, a Nissan official told the news outlet…

 

Managing without Growth. Slower by Design, not Disaster

It took homo sapiens some 200,000 years to reach the first billion by about 1800. In just the 10 years separating the first and second edition of Managing without Growth: Slower by Design, not Disaster, the human population increased by the same amount putting increased pressure on an already crowded planet. In the past decade the global use of resources spiked upwards, greenhouse gas emissions continued to increase, income and wealth inequality rose to the highest levels in half a century, the global financial system almost crashed, and mammal, bird and insect populations declined markedly because of increased deforestation and industrialized agriculture. So, while material living standards of the poorest rose, mostly in China, which is something to celebrate, there are many reasons to be deeply concerned about what lies ahead. Humanity’s grossly unequal ecological footprints greatly exceed the Earth’s regenerative biocapacity and it is doubtful whether the planet can support the continued economic growth to which virtually all of the world’s governments are committed.  Can we do better….

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This entry was posted on 25/02/2019 by in Uncategorized and tagged .

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