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Can Voting Make You More Resilient?

undergrads

From left, students Clayton Millard and Lydia He, Professor Paul Dallas, and students Aliya Ghare and Janine Kwok discuss the students’ work at OCAD University. Giving students the right kind of criticism can help them develop resilience. Full story: https://www.theglobeandmail.com/canada/education/canadian-university-report/article-giving-students-the-right-kind-of-criticism-can-help-them-develop/?cmpid=rss

Can Voting Make You More Resilient?

We don’t typically think of voting from a psychological perspective.  In fact, for most Americans it is something we don’t think about at all.  The United States ranks 26th among industrial countries in voting participation. Americans are near the very bottom of the participation scale, with only 55.7%  of the voting age population voting, compared, for example to 87.2%  of Belgium citizens.

But I would suggest that exercising the voluntary “right” to vote contributes to the enhancement of all 9 pillars of my model of resilience.  In other words, by engaging in the voting process, by voting, you can increase your level of resilience.  How is that possible…

 

This Ridiculously Easy 10-Minute Exercise Might Make You Smarter, Says New Neurological Research

The physical and psychological benefits of exercising regularly are well-documented. But what about the impact on the brain: Can exercise improve cognitive function?

Yes, it can, according to a new neurological study published by scientists from the University of California, Irvine, and the University of Tsukuba in Japan. Summarizing the key findings of their research, Gretchen Reynolds of The New York Times reports that even a slow, 10-minute stroll in the park, for example, can boost your memory.

The scientists invited 36 college students into their lab where they were instructed to sit quietly on a stationary bike for 10 minutes. The students were also asked to pedal the bike lightly, barely enough to get their heartbeat up to 30 percent of its maximum rate.

After this incredibly light exercise, the students were then given a computerized test which flashed images of objects like trees, and asked then to recall whether it was new or a previously shown object…

 

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This entry was posted on 12/11/2018 by in Uncategorized and tagged , , .

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