resilience reporter

resilience starts with information

Urban Resilience: student ventures into sinking shanty town

FEMA avoids ‘climate change’ when introducing future storm resiliency plans

puerto_rico_hurricane_getty_lead

© Getty Images FEMA released an After-Action Report on Friday that concluded it inadequately provided support to hurricane victims in Puerto Rico, a majority of whom were left without power and clean water for months.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is taking blame for its response to Hurricane Maria, which devastated communities across Puerto Rico last summer, but the agency and its leaders are largely avoiding all mention of climate change preparedness.

Speaking at an event Tuesday, FEMA Deputy Administrator for Resilience Daniel Kaniewski remarked on the agency’s new plan to reduce community risk and enhance its “culture of preparedness” by focusing on resiliency….

 

Keep calm and carry on, new handbook for disasters

The handbook uses practical examples to illustrate nationally agreed principles for risk assessment, effective communication, emergency and health planning, site design and other key considerations for crowds….

 

Urban Resilience: student ventures into sinking shanty town

“Standing up to your ankles in rising waters in Holland, is not the same thing as wading up to your neck in a tidal wave flood in a street in Jakarta.” Arya Putra recently obtained his Master’s degree at the faculty of Geo-Information Science in Twente. For his thesis research he went home to Jakarta and had a close look at Cordaid’s resilience project in Marunda, one of the world’s fastest sinking urban areas.

There – on Jakarta’s beleaguered northern shore – he conducted his Urban Planning and Management field research for several weeks. Object of his research: to review Cordaid’s resilience project and find out how community participatory processes help local citizens influence the city’s spatial planning….

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