resilience reporter

resilience starts with information

New Report Looks at Past Disasters to Prepare for the Future

The Australian Natural Disaster Resilience Index

The Australian Natural Disaster Resilience Index (ANDRI) is Australia’s first national-scale standardised snapshot of disaster resilience. The ANDRI has a hierarchical design based on eight themes: social character, economic capital, infrastructure and planning, emergency services, community capital, information and engagement, governance, policy and leadership and social and community engagement. This talk will present the findings of the assessment of disaster resilience as strengths and opportunities for disaster resilience in Australian communities. For example, in most of Victoria and coastal NSW disaster resilience…

 

The battle over terminology: Adaptation vs resilience

In the negotiations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), every word used can be contested between countries (sometimes they even argue for hours about a coma!). Hence every term has to be accepted by consensus by all the countries for it to be adopted in any UNFCCC decision…

 

New Report Looks at Past Disasters to Prepare for the Future

volcano-eruption

The eruption of Mount Tambora in 1815 – detailed in the report – was the most devastating volcanic event of the last thousand years, killing over 70,000 people in its immediate vicinity.

The great disasters of the past – like the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 AD or the hurricane that devastated Santo Domingo in 1930 – can provide valuable lessons to help governments and institutions increase the resilience of communities in the face of modern challenges, such as climate change and rapid urbanization.

Released today by the Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery (GFDRR), Aftershocks: Remodeling the Past for a Resilient Future looks at various disasters from the distant and recent past and explores the likely impacts similar events would have if they were to occur in today’s more populous and connected world.

The eruption of Mount Tambora in 1815 – detailed in the report – was the most devastating volcanic event of the last thousand years, killing over 70,000 people in its immediate vicinity. Particles from the eruption blocked sunlight, contributing to a 3o C decline in global temperatures, which caused the global ‘year without a summer’ of 1816. Crops failed in China, Europe, and North America, and famine took hold in some parts of the world….

 

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