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California can look forward to more extreme dry-wet “climate whiplash”

The Harrowing Floods of Bangladesh, in Photos

“I am documenting what’s around me not only as a photojournalist, but also as a victim,” Jashim Salam says. In Chittagong, Bangladesh, where he lives and works, rising water levels during monsoon season have left houses and places of business below water. “It started very slowly, six or seven years ago,” he tells me. “The water is rising year by year.” Water World is his ongoing record of the people and lives affected by the floods.

As a major urban center, Chittagong is already home to climate refugees from rural areas, but Salam worries about the future of the city. When the floods are bad, school and work stops, and the water forces families to make major changes at home…

 

California can look forward to more extreme dry-wet “climate whiplash”

As the last few years have reminded us, California weather means you have to be prepared for anything. From 2012 to 2016, the Golden State saw a historic drought that led to water restrictions—and saw land areas sinking as groundwater use increased to compensate. But the winter of 2016 brought too much rain, producing flooding and evacuations below the Oroville Dam.

Variable rainfall is a natural component of California’s climate, but what will happen as climate change continues to play out? That’s the question a team led by UCLA’s Daniel Swain recently set out to answer…

 

A Hawaiian island got about 50 inches of rain in 24 hours. Scientists warn it’s a sign of the future

floodwaters

A Hawaiian island got about 50 inches of rain in 24 hours. Scientists warn it’s a sign of the future! Floodwaters on the Hawaiian island of Kauai turned orange, a sign of the high iron content in the volcanic soil. (Brandon Verdura / Associated Press)

Since the 1940s, the Hawaiian island of Kauai has endured two tsunamis and two hurricanes, but locals say they have never experienced anything like the thunderstorm that drenched the island this month.

“The rain gauge in Hanalei broke at 28 inches within 24 hours,” said state Rep. Nadine Nakamura of the North Shore community. “In a neighboring valley, their rain gauge showed 44 inches within 24 hours. It’s off the charts.”

Actually, it was even worse. This week the National Weather Service said nearly 50 inches of rain fell in 24 hours…

 

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This entry was posted on 02/05/2018 by in Uncategorized and tagged , , , .

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