resilience reporter

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The year is 2037. This is what happens when the hurricane hits Miami

Large Swaths of Southern California Are in Ruins Thanks to the Catastrophic Thomas Fire

wildfires in Cal

The wildfire is now the third-largest in California history and is just 40 percent contained, with over 8,400 firefighters and $110 million in resources deployed to fight it. Photo:AP

Wildfires in California have continued to ravage large portions of the state, with the Thomas fire in southern California now entering its 13th day and claiming over 267,500 acres of land, CNN reported. The wildfire is now the third-largest in California history and is just 40 percent contained, with over 8,400 firefighters and $110 million in resources deployed to fight it.

Now-familiar scenes posted by the Santa Barbara County Fire Department and others this weekend showed Ventura and Santa Barbara counties descending into a nightmarish state, just as with a prior spate of wildfires elsewhere in California earlier this year. Ventura resident Patricia Rye told KEYT she had woken up in the middle of the night after her son-in-law arrived and did not have time to grab anything before…

 

The year is 2037. This is what happens when the hurricane hits Miami

After the hurricane hit Miami in 2037, a foot of sand covered the famous bow-tie floor in the lobby of the Fontainebleau Hotel in Miami Beach. A dead manatee floated in the pool where Elvis had once swum. Most of the damage came not from the hurricane’s 175-mile-an-hour winds, but from the twenty-foot storm surge that overwhelmed the low-lying city.

In South Beach, historic Art Deco buildings were swept off their foundations. Mansions on Star Island were flooded up to their cut-glass doorknobs. A seventeen-mile stretch of Highway A1A that ran along the famous beaches up to Fort Lauderdale disappeared into the Atlantic. The storm knocked out the wastewater-treatment plant on Virginia Key, forcing the city to dump hundreds of millions of gallons of raw sewage into Biscayne Bay.

Tampons and condoms littered the beaches, and the stench of human excrement stoked fears of cholera. More than three hundred people died, many of them swept away by the surging waters that submerged much of Miami Beach and Fort Lauderdale; thirteen people were killed in traffic accidents as they scrambled to escape the city after the news spread—falsely, it turned out—that one of the nuclear reactors at Turkey Point, an aging power plant twenty-four miles south of Miami, had been destroyed by the surge and had sent….

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