resilience reporter

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The Deadliest Volcano in the United States Just Got Really Weird

New warning sirens for Suva by 2018

Five early warning sirens to protect Fijians in the case of a natural disaster are set to be established in Suva by 2018.  The newly proposed sites for the warning sirens are: Police Mobile Unit at 8 miles to cover low lying areas of Laqere, Nepani and Nadawa; Vatuwaqa FINTEL area to cover Vatuwaqa to Laucala Beach; Ganilau House or Civic Towers to cover the middle of Suva city; Pacific Theological College to cover the Nasese area; and the Walu Bay area to Ports Authority.  These additional sirens will complete the systems already installed at the University of the South Pacific which covers Suva Point to My Suva Picnic Park and the other in Lami town.  The initiative is a part of the Pacific Community’s (SPC) Building Safety and Resilience in the Pacific (BSRP) project, one of the largest disaster…

 

 

Grant Signed To Improve Disaster Resilience for Herders in Mongolia

The Asian Development Bank (ADB) and the Government of Mongolia today signed a $3 million grant to pilot community-based approaches to disaster risk management in parts of Dornod, Gobi-Altai, Khuvsgul and Sukbaatar aimags to increase herders’ resilience to dzuds, fires, and other disasters.

The grant is funded by the Japanese government-financed Japan Fund for Poverty Reduction (JFPR), which over the past 16 years has supported projects in Mongolia dealing with poverty alleviation, community development, livelihoods, and the environment.

Signing the agreement on behalf of the Government of Mongolia was Vice Minister of Finance Kh. Bulgantuya while ADB Country Director Yolanda Fernandez Lommen…

 

The Deadliest Volcano in the United States Just Got Really Weird

A plume of steam and ash billowing out of Mt. Saint Helens in 1982, two years after the most destructive eruption in US history. Image: Wikimedia

A plume of steam and ash billowing out of Mt. Saint Helens in 1982, two years after the most destructive eruption in US history. Image: Wikimedia

Picture a volcanic eruption: fiery magma and smoke billowing skyward as a towering mountain empties its over-pressurized belly of a hot meal. At least, that’s how most of us think it works. So you can imagine volcanologists’ surprise when they discovered that Mount St. Helens, which was responsible for the deadliest eruption in US history, is actually cold inside.  Apparently, it’s stealing its fire from somewhere else.  Mount St. Helens is one of the most active volcanoes of the Cascade Arc, a string of eruptive mountains that runs parallel to the Cascadia subduction zone from northern California to British Columbia. It’s also one of the strangest. Most major volcanoes…

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