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Buenos Aires community which left its poor neighbours under water. Antarctic Ice Melt May Be Worse Than Scientists Thought. And more…

Story of cities #46: the gated Buenos Aires community which left its poor neighbours under water

 Residents sit on a bench at a flooded public square after a rainstorm in Buenos Aires in 2013. Photograph: Enrique Marcarian/Reuters

Residents sit on a bench at a flooded public square after a rainstorm in Buenos Aires in 2013. Photograph: Enrique Marcarian/Reuters

The richest and poorest residents of Argentina’s capital are separated by the walls of gated communities. When heavy rains in 2013 left those outside the barriers vulnerable to severe flooding, their only hope was to tear them down On 2 April 2013, Matías Duarte awoke at three in the morning. For once it was not the noise of his alarm clock that stirred him, but the sound of pouring rain outside – and a room flooded to the level of his bed.  Duarte lived in Las Tunas, a working-class neighbourhood 35km north-west of Argentina’s capital, Buenos Aires. Running through the centre of the neighbourhood is the arroyo Las Tunas, a small creek. Though the arroyo had flooded before, it had never been this severe.  Panicked, Duarte waded out of his room. Outside, the rest of his family were desperately trying to salvage what few possessions they could before leaving the house. A neighbour banged on their front door: “We’ve got to get down to the wall,” he called out. “We’re tearing it down.”…

 

Antarctic Ice Melt May Be Worse Than Scientists Thought

Melting ice from one of Antarctica’s largest glaciers due to climate change could raise global sea levels by more than 2 meters (6.6 feet), according to new research. The study, published in the journal Nature, relies on data on past ice levels of the Totten Glacier in East Antarctica to evaluate the rate of melting. Without intense efforts to stem man-made global warming, the glacier’s melting process could cross the point of no return within the next 100 years, according to report. The result would add more than 6.6 feet (2 meters) of sea level…

 

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