resilience reporter

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How dust from the Sahara fuels poisonous bacteria blooms in the Caribbean. And more

28% of US bees wiped out this winter, suggesting bigger environmental issues

More than a quarter of American honeybee colonies were wiped out over the winter, with deadly infestations of mites and harmful land management practices heaping mounting pressure upon the crucial pollinators and the businesses that keep them. Preliminary figures commissioned by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) show that 28% of bee colonies in the United States were lost over the 2015-16 winter. More than half of surveyed beekeepers said they suffered unsustainable losses during the winter…

 

How dust from the Sahara fuels poisonous bacteria blooms in the Caribbean

In this animation of Earth Observatory images, hundreds of millions of tons of dust are picked up from the deserts of Africa and blown across the Atlantic Ocean each year. (NASA Earth Observatory)

In this animation of Earth Observatory images, hundreds of millions of tons of dust are picked up from the deserts of Africa and blown across the Atlantic Ocean each year. (NASA Earth Observatory)

Leave your car parked outside in Miami for too many days in August, and you’re likely to see a fine film of orange powder coating the windshield. It’s dust — African dust — carried thousands of miles across the Atlantic to parking lots in Florida. This phenomenon, known as the Saharan Air Layer, brings several hundred million tons of dust to the Americas each year. It helps build beaches in the Caribbean and carries nutrients that fertilize the Amazon rainforest. The dust is also thought to help suppress hurricanes along the coast…

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