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Sea Level Rise Could Displace 13 Million Americans

A new climate change study offers possibly the grimmest outlook yet for U.S. coastal residents. Up to 13.1 million Americans could be forced from their homes by the end of the century because of global sea level rise, warns a paper published in the journal Nature Climate Change this week. That’s a three-fold increase over previous projections. And if protective measures are not taken, researchers said the mass departure from impacted areas could rival that of the Great Migration of more than 6 million African Americans from the rural South during the 20th century…

 

Proactive Business Resilience Via Cognitive Computing

Five years ago, the world was introduced to Watson, IBM’s cognitive computing system, which defeated two human champions in an exhibition match of the American game show Jeopardy. Watson has learned a lot since then, tackling ever more complex data sets to develop understanding, reasoning and learning capabilities that go far beyond answering trivia questions…

 

The Plagues That Might Have Brought Down the Roman Empire

Tourists visit the Basilica Cistern in Istanbul March 2, 2010. Turkey's largest city is a 2010 European Capital of Culture filled with the treasures of a glorious past from the Roman and Ottoman empires, while straddling the Bosphorous Strait where Europe meets Asia. Picture taken March 2, 2010. To match Reuters Life! TRAVEL-ISTANBUL/. REUTERS/Murad Sezer (TURKEY - Tags: SOCIETY TRAVEL) - RTR2BUIO

Tourists visit the Basilica Cistern in Istanbul March 2, 2010. Turkey’s largest city is a 2010 European Capital of Culture filled with the treasures of a glorious past from the Roman and Ottoman empires, while straddling the Bosphorous Strait where Europe meets Asia. Picture taken March 2, 2010. To match Reuters Life! TRAVEL-ISTANBUL/. REUTERS/Murad Sezer (TURKEY – Tags: SOCIETY TRAVEL) – RTR2BUIO

What brought down the Roman Empire? By the end of his The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, even the great historian Edward Gibbon was sick of the question. He noted that instead of speculating about the reasons for Rome’s long, slow collapse between (depending on whom you ask) the third and seventh centuries C.E., we should instead marvel that it lasted so long in the first place…

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This entry was posted on 22/03/2016 by in Uncategorized and tagged , , .

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