resilience reporter

resilience starts with information

Resilient Australia Awards. Disaster Resilient Future…and more.

Resilient Australia Awards

The Resilient Australia Awards is a national program to recognise and promote initiatives which strengthen community disaster resilience across the nation, making our communities safer, stronger, more resilient and better prepared to manage any emergency situation. By celebrating innovation and exemplary practice, the awards showcase work that is often unseen, motivating others to think about how they can be better prepared and more disaster resilient. The awards program started in 2000, and has a solid history in Australia’s emergency management sector…

 

Toyota’s Efforts to Build a Disaster Resilient Future

toyota_logo

Shioyasaki lighthouse is an unassuming white structure perched atop a rocky outcrop overlooking Japan’s Pacific coast. For over a century, the lighthouse-closely associated with Fukushima Prefecture-has served as an essential navigational aid for passing ships, imparting an important sense of security for those out at sea. Beyond being a symbol of nautical safety, the lighthouse also bears the scars of the earthquake and tsunami that devastated Japan’s Tohoku region five years ago. Briefly shut down in the aftermath of those events, the lighthouse was relit once again, and now serves as a reminder of the resilience of Tohoku’s local communities…

 

At Japan’s Fukushima nuclear complex, robots aiding the cleanup after 2011 disaster

Yusuke Nakagawa of Tokyo Electric Power Co. works in the team that operates the robots used to decontaminate the reactor buildings.   (Christopher Furlong / Getty Images)

Yusuke Nakagawa of Tokyo Electric Power Co. works in the team that operates the robots used to decontaminate the reactor buildings.
(Christopher Furlong / Getty Images)

Hiroshi Endo spent a decade building a robotic arm that Japan deployed to the International Space Station in 2010. But his next challenge made that one look easy. In 2011, Endo, a 61-year-old retired engineer at Hitachi, the Tokyo-based mega-corporation, began designing a robot to aid in decommissioning the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, the site of a meltdown that marked the worst nuclear crisis since Ukraine’s Chernobyl disaster in 1986…

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

MORE RESOURCES

MORE RESOURCES

%d bloggers like this: