resilience reporter

resilience starts with information

In case of a disaster, ‘grab it and go’…and more

Sydney storms: tornado, hail, wind and flash-flooding wreak havoc across city

Severe thunderstorms have wreaked havoc across Sydney, with flash-flooding, golfball-sized hail and wind gusts of more than 200km/h – the strongest recorded in New South Wales history – as well as a likely tornado. The Bureau of Meteoreology (BoM) issued warnings for tornados and “very dangerous thunderstorms” on Wednesday morning. Rainfall of 144mm was recorded in one hour to 10.30am at Long Island Point, just south of Nowra, while wind gusts exceeded 100km/h in several parts of Sydney. Emergency services were called to respond to multiple reports of building collapses, including businesses and residential properties. Torrential rain flooded vehicles, causing damage to numerous cars and engines. Multiple flights to and from Sydney airport were cancelled, while others were diverted. Gridlocked traffic in the suburbs surrounding the airport – with buses delayed by up to two hours – prompted some travellers to abandon their cars and walk the final kilometre or so to the terminal…

 

In case of a disaster, ‘grab it and go’

Natural disasters have no friends or foes, with reports indicating that emerging economies in Asia, including India, are among the top 10 countries facing the greatest financial risk from natural disasters. The most recent example, of floods in Chennai, has also focussed attention on India and its share of major disasters. These include the floods in Kashmir (2014) and Uttarakhand (2013), the Latur earthquake (1993) and the Tsunami (2004). “These are obvious examples that [show how] in times of crises, [a] little preparedness can go [a] long way in helping oneself and its concerns. In [the] golden hour, it’s the individual first who always step[s] in instantly when disasters strike. You have to remember that [the] extent of damage is too large and it may take some reasonable time [before] that help reaches to you. The golden…

 

Improving the climate for women

United Nations climate chief Christiana Figueres was the most influential woman at the Paris climate change talks. Photo: Christophe Ena

United Nations climate chief Christiana Figueres was the most influential woman at the Paris climate change talks. Photo: Christophe Ena

As global temperatures rise and people face displacement and death from extreme weather events, it is women who have the most to lose. So why are there so few influential women at the climate-change decision-making table?…

 

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