resilience reporter

resilience starts with information

Strategy to ensure Scotland leads on cyber resilience…and more

Swinney sets out strategy to ensure Scotland leads on cyber resilience

SCOTLAND could become a world leader in cyber resilience, according to the Deputy First Minister. And John Swinney has set out a new strategy to make sure it happens. He told the National Economic Forum in Edinburgh yesterday that digital technology brought huge benefits to the country, but could also be used to defraud people and businesses, steal intellectual property, bully vulnerable people or damage critical infrastructure. The new initiative – Safe, Secure and Prosperous: A Cyber Resilience Strategy for Scotland – sets out how individuals and businesses can increase their online sturdiness and enable Scotland to become a world leader in the field. It was developed following public consultation earlier this year and lays out a series of desired outcomes for the country by 2020. These include…

 

Building global stability, resilience

This annual summit, our seventh, convenes at what may very well be an important inflection point in our history. The unprecedented challenges and opportunities that we are confronted with today underscore the importance of the Atlantic Council’s mission: To foster the transatlantic relationship and help shape policy choices to build a more secure future. Our summit has become a preeminent venue for global business and government leaders to share a common platform and discuss ways to address daunting challenges and harness exciting opportunities. This year, more than 400 delegates from over forty countries, including one president, two prime ministers, twenty ministers, and more than forty global CEOs and heads of nongovernmental organizations are attending…

 

Brazil toxic mudslide devastates local water supply – in pictures

The toxic mud has polluted the Rio Doce (Portuguese for ‘sweet river’) used by indigenous people, such as Fabiana Rothy, from Brazilia’s Krenak tribe, to fish and celebrate religious ceremonies. Photograph: Heriberto Araújo for the Guardian

The toxic mud has polluted the Rio Doce (Portuguese for ‘sweet river’) used by indigenous people, such as Fabiana Rothy, from Brazilia’s Krenak tribe, to fish and celebrate religious ceremonies.
Photograph: Heriberto Araújo for the Guardian

Iron ore residue from the collapse of a mining dam, part-owned by BHP Billiton, has been passing down the Rio Doce in south-east Brazil. Pollutants have killed aquatic life and left residents of the towns of Resplendor and Baixo Guandu without clean water…

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Information

This entry was posted on 22/11/2015 by in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , .

MORE RESOURCES

MORE RESOURCES

%d bloggers like this: