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Three years later, feds pleased with Sandy response…and more

Three years later, feds pleased with Sandy response

Federal Emergency Management Agency Administrator Craig Fugate says you’ll never catch him saying he’s satisfied with the government’s ability to respond to natural disasters. But Fugate said that three years after Superstorm Sandy ravaged the northeast, the federal government has performed far better than it has for previous disasters like Hurricane Katrina. He said the $50.5 billion aid package passed by Congress in the months following Sandy, combined with a focus on getting federal agencies to work together on response and rebuilding projects, has left the recovery efforts three years ahead of schedule. “Large disasters are inherently complex. It always takes longer than people think it should,” he said. “But when I look at the overall situation an

 

Students help victims of disasters by mapping sticken areas

(KUTV) When disaster strikes, people around the world ask what they can do to help. While there is always a need for money and volunteers, there is another way you can help and the University of Utah is willing to help you get started. Geography students at the University of Utah are pulling together a large-scale effort to help aid workers in the wake of hurricane Patricia. Students, alumni and even a few geography majors from BYU gathered at 5 p.m. at the University’s Orson Spencer Hall to make a dent in an urgent need. They are mapping the damaged areas of Mexico…

 

Newcastle scientist uses NASA experience to study impact of earthquakes on gravity field

Photo: Former NASA scientist Professor Shin-Chan Han is researching the impacts earthquakes have on the planet. (1233 ABC Newcastle: Robert Virtue)

Photo: Former NASA scientist Professor Shin-Chan Han is researching the impacts earthquakes have on the planet. (1233 ABC Newcastle: Robert Virtue)

A former scientist with NASA who is now based in the New South Wales city of Newcastle is using data collected from global disasters to fuel his research into how the Earth is changing. Professor Shin-Chan Han moved to Newcastle earlier this year to continue his study of geodesy, after spending years in the United States and his native South Korea. Professor Han’s interest in Earth science began after being fascinated with global positioning systems (GPS). He then transitioned into researching geodesy — the study of the Earth’s shape, gravity field and rotation — for his PhD. After stints at universities in Seoul and Ohio, Professor Han accepted a job at NASA in 2006, where he was a researcher on the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission. “I was analysing the GRACE satellite data set. Using satellite measurements, we were able to determine the [extent of] ocean tide underneath the ice shelf in Antarctica,” Professor Han said. “We were able to determine how much water is stored in the big…

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