resilience reporter

resilience starts with information

How Hurricane Patricia Compares to Katrina in One Photo…and more

How Hurricane Patricia Compares to Katrina in One Photo

Hurricane Patricia has been downgraded to a tropical depression, but not before gaining notoriety as the strongest hurricane on record in the Western Hemisphere. So how does it compare to another major storm, Hurricane Katrina? As the photo comparison shows, Patricia (on the left) covered a much larger area at its peak than Katrina (right), though both were Category 5 Hurricanes. But when the eye of Patricia’s storm made landfall on Friday night in southwest Mexico, maximum sustained winds were estimated at 165 mph, according to the Weather Channel; Katrina, in comparison, saw maximum sustained winds of around 140 mph when it made landfall near Grand Isle, La., according to the National Weather Service. Patricia reached a peak of 200 mph sustained winds, compared with Katrina’s 175 mph. However, when measuring a storm’s size (as opposed to its strength), meteorologists often think about the diameter of the storm’s eye…

 

Life in Nepal six months post-quake

bus-in-nepal-data

On April 25, 2015, a 7.8-magnitude earthquake hit Nepal. Many aftershocks followed and a second 7.3-magnitude earthquake on May 12 caused further widespread destruction. The onset of monsoon further complicated the situation. These images taken by CARE International’s Brian Sokol serve as a record of what life is like in Dhading District, Nepal, six months after the initial earthquake…

 

Politics should not be used in disaster relief

The other night, we were deeply moved by an ANC story about the pitiful plight of a farmer because of Typhoon Lando – the 12th typhoon to hit the country this year and said to be the most devastating so far. The farmer was mourning the damage to his anticipated harvest and lamenting the fact that all he owned had been lost except for his carabao. The farmer, who already owed P100,000 – was naturally worried about the future for his family. “Bahala na” was all he could say to cope with his doleful situation, expressing hope that government would provide help to farmers like him who have almost nothing left…

 

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