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Safe at last? View from Naraha – the first Fukushima community declared fit for humans…and more

Safe at last? View from Naraha – the first Fukushima community declared fit for humans

 Kohei and Tomoko Yamauchi at their home in Naraha. Photograph: Justin McCurry for the Guardian

Kohei and Tomoko Yamauchi at their home in Naraha. Photograph: Justin McCurry for the Guardian

Entering the living room of Kohei and Tomoko Yamauchi’s house in Naraha is a disconcerting experience. Above the tatami-mat floor, the shelves are lined with rows of kokeshi dolls; to one side is a large display of daruma figures, a traditional harbinger of good fortune. Kohei’s ancestors look down from framed black-and-white photographs mounted on the wall. It is hard to imagine a more immaculate home. Yet for four and a half years, the Yamauchis’ house, along with every other home in the picturesque town in Fukushima prefecture, was deserted…

 

Sea level rise will swallow Miami, New Orleans: study

Miami (AFP) – Say goodbye to Miami and New Orleans. No matter what we do to curb global warming, these and other beloved US cities will sink below rising seas, according to a study Monday. But making extreme carbon cuts and moving to renewable energy could save millions of people living in iconic coastal areas of the United States, said the findings in the October 12 edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a peer-reviewed US journal. Scientists have already established that if we do nothing to reduce…

 

Cities Built to Endure Disaster

Last week, when Hurricane Joaquin briefly looked to be headed for the Northeast, New Yorkers had flashbacks of the havoc wrought three years ago by superstorm Sandy. Sandy left behind flooded subways, rivers running down streets, swaths of the Jersey Shore buried in sand and millions of people without power, heat or gasoline. It also carved a deep path through the economy. Sandy was the second-costliest storm in American history, after Katrina. Much of the public blamed Sandy on a warming climate. But the principal reason for Sandy’s devastating impact is that millions of productive people live and work in a place…

 

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