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World Resilience NEWS: SOUDELOR Additional Coverage

In this image released by the New Taipei Fire Department, emergency rescue personnel carrying children pass crushed cars from a flash mudslide caused by Typhoon Soudelor in Xindian, New Taipei City, northern Taiwan, Aug. 8, 2015. (New Taipei Fire Department via AP)

In this image released by the New Taipei Fire Department, emergency rescue personnel carrying children pass crushed cars from a flash mudslide caused by Typhoon Soudelor in Xindian, New Taipei City, northern Taiwan, Aug. 8, 2015. (New Taipei Fire Department via AP)

Typhoon Soudelor Timeline: Up to 52 Inches of Rain in Taiwan, 145-MPH Gust in Japan; Final Landfall in China

Here’s what you need to know:

  • Soudelor’s first landfall occurred on the east coast of Taiwan around 5 a.m. Taiwan time Saturday, according to Taiwan’s Central Weather Bureau.
  • Soudelor’s second landfall occurred in Xiuyu District, Putian City, Fujian Province, in the People’s Republic of China, at 10:10 p.m. local time Saturday according to the Chinese Meteorological Administration. Maximum sustained winds at landfall were 38 meters per second (85 mph), and the minimum central pressure was 970 millibars.
  • Sustained winds of at least tropical storm force (39 mph, or 18 meters per second) were reported across almost all of Taiwan.
  • Taiwanese electric utility Taipower reported that more than 4 million customers lost power at one time or another during the storm.
  • The official death toll in Taiwan was six as of midday Saturday U.S. time.
  • Highest reported gust: 64.7 meters per second (145 mph) at 3:17 a.m. Japanese time Saturday at Yonaguni-jima, Japan.
  • Highest reported sustained wind: 45.1 meters per second (101 mph) at 3:20 a.m. JST Saturday at Yonaguni-jima, Japan.
  • Highest reported gust in Taiwan: 64.0 meters per second (143 mph) at 5 a.m. Taiwan time Saturday at Su-ao, Yilan County. However, the Central Weather Bureau deleted all wind data for this site, so the accuracy may be in question. The next-highest gust was 58.5 meters per second (131 mph) on the island of Pengjiayu, northeast of mainland Taiwan.
  • Highest reported sustained wind in Taiwan: 41.7 meters per second (93 mph) on the island of Pengjiayu at 12:30 p.m. Saturday local time.
  • Highest reported rainfall total: 1329.0 millimeters (52.32 inches) at Taipingshan, Datong Township, Yilan County, Taiwan, during the 72-hour period from Aug. 6 through Aug. 8.
  • In the capital, Taipei: Winds gusted as high as 86 mph in the city center, while nearby Taoyuan International Airport gusted to 93 mph. Taipei reported 322.5 millimeters (12.70 inches) of rain in the city center, but some areas of the city had more than double that total. The Mao Kong observation site in the city’s Wenshan District reported 659.0 millimeters (25.94 inches) of rainfall.
  • In the People’s Republic of China: Changle International Airport in Fuzhou, China, clocked sustained winds of 58 mph with gusts to 83 mph Saturday evening local time. Fuzhou reported 244.6 millimeters (9.63 inches) of rainfall during the 36-hour period ending at 8 p.m. local time Saturday.

 

(MORE: Typhoon Soudelor Forecast | Storm Reports | Storm Photos)

 

Below is a timeline of updates and images from the storm as it happened, including commentary from The Weather Channel meteorologists and with images from our photojournalists on the scene in Taiwan. You’ll also see images and videos from social media, showing the storm through the eyes of those who lived through it…

 

Typhoon Soudelor: Thousands evacuated as storm hits China

Photo: Residents gather to see huge waves stirred up by strong wind as Typhoon Soudelor draws near the mainland of China. (AFP: STR)

Photo: Residents gather to see huge waves stirred up by strong wind as Typhoon Soudelor draws near the mainland of China. (AFP: STR)

At least 250,000 people have been evacuated from China’s coastal provinces of Fujian and Zhejiang ahead of the arrival of Typhoon Soudelor, which killed five in Taiwan and left a trail of destruction. The typhoon ripped up trees and triggered landslides in Taiwan, and knocked out power to 1.5 million homes. Rivers broke their banks under torrential rain and towering waves pounded the island’s coastline. As a slightly weakened Soudelor arrives in mainland China, strong winds and heavy rain have already cut off power and destroyed farm crops along China’s eastern coast, state media reported. “The tap water has stopped. The electricity is out. I’m hiding at home and scared to go outside,” housewife Pan Danyun, who lives in Fujian’s Fuzhou city, told AFP….

 

Mudslide devastates Taiwanese village as typhoon Soudelor hits – video

A large mudslide sweeps through a Taiwanese mountain village after typhoon Soudelor makes landfall. A river of mud is seen careening through Taoyuan, in the country’s northwest, carrying with it trees and homes. Soudelor hit the small island nation on Saturday morning, leaving at least four people dead, and dozens injured, according to local media…

 

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This entry was posted on 09/08/2015 by in Uncategorized and tagged , .

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