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Resilience NEWS: THE PACIFIC TSUNAMI 10 years on EDITION

Numbers That Tell Story of 2004 Tsunami Disaster

Facts and figures from the Dec. 26, 2004, Indian Ocean tsunami. Sources include the Tsunami Evaluation Coalition and UNESCO:..

 

Then and now: the aftermath of the 2004 Indonesian tsunami – in pictures

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These photos revisit the devastation in Banda Aceh, the coastal town hit hardest by the 2004 tsunami triggered by an earthquake…

 

Aceh resilient 10 years after tsunami

Ten years after a tsunami hit this city on December 26, 2004, killing 167,000 people, roads and bridges have been rebuilt, there are houses on the beach, trees have grown back, and the millions of tonnes of debris that covered the island are gone. But for a first-time visitor, reminders of the disaster seem to be everywhere. A sculpture of a giant wave marks Lambaro, one of four mass gravesites, where 46,000 bodies are buried. A hotel front desk displays a photo of smashed boats filling its parking lot. The dome of a mosque – torn off its building 1.5 kilometres away – rests in an emerald-green rice field…

 

Critical gaps remain in early warning 10 years after Indian Ocean tsunami – UN

15 December 2014 – A decade after the Indian Ocean tsunami struck, the Asia-Pacific region remains highly disaster prone and critical gaps remain in early warning, especially in reaching the most vulnerable people and remote communities, the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) said today. “Ten years after the Indian Ocean tsunami, much has been done to fill gaps in risk reduction, disaster preparedness and early warning systems,” Shamika N. Sirimanne, ESCAP’s Director of Information and Communications Technology and Disaster Risk Reduction Division said in a press release issued today…

 

2004 Indonesian Tsunami, a Decade Later (Photos)

On December 26, 2004, a magnitude-9.2 earthquake in the Indian Ocean off the coast of Indonesia triggered tsunamis that would turn out to be one of the deadliest natural disasters in history. Just 15 to 20 minutes after the earthquake, tsunami waves up to 100 feet high traveling at breakneck speeds obliterated the Indonesian coast, particularly Banda Aceh, Ace province Indonesia’s largest city, the USGS notes. Because of Banda Aceh’s low-lying, coastal location, the first three tsunami waves stacked on top of each other, increasing wave heights and pushing water further inland…

 

Boxing Day tsunami in 2004 felt as ‘far away as SA’; 10-year anniversary approaches

oz tsunamiAs the 10-year anniversary of the 2004 Boxing Day earthquake and tsunami approaches, an Australian expert says it is a little known fact that the effects were felt as far away as South Australia. Abnormal currents and ocean tides found their way around Australia’s south-western tip from an earthquake epicentre about 3,000 kilometres away off the coast of Sumatra. The earthquake was so powerful it buckled more than 1,200 kilometres of ocean floor by up to 10 metres and released the energy of about 20,000 atomic bombs…

 

Ten years after the Indian Ocean tsunami: Walking the last mile together on early warning — Shamshad Akhtar

On 26 December 2004, the world experienced one of the deadliest natural disasters ever recorded. A 9.1 magnitude earthquake off the west coast of Sumatra, Indonesia, triggered a massive tsunami that directly affected fourteen countries in Asia and Africa. The tectonic shifting of plates and the widespread impact of the resulting waves, led to 230,000 deaths and massive human suffering…

 

Ten Years After Indian Ocean Tsunami: Walking Last Mile Together On Early Warning – OpEd

On 26 December 2004, the world experienced one of the deadliest natural disasters ever recorded. A 9.1 magnitude earthquake off the west coast of Sumatra, Indonesia, triggered a massive tsunami that directly affected fourteen countries in Asia and Africa. The tectonic shifting of plates and the widespread impact of the resulting waves, led to 230,000 deaths and massive human suffering…

 

Millions of dollars for Aceh go missing

Millions of dollars in foreign donations which flowed into Aceh after the Boxing Day tsunami a decade ago disappeared into the pockets of the province’s new political elite despite a broadly successful and corruption-free reconstruction process. Some money also went to build projects that are now empty, unused and decaying. On the 10th anniversary of the gigantic wave which killed 167,000 people, and after $US7.7 billion in foreign reconstruction funds has been spent, Aceh is still one of the poorest provinces in Indonesia. Now the local government is planning to sell off its own forest reserve — the last place where orangutans, rhinos, elephants and tigers still live together — to make ends meet…

 

Anniversary lesson: our generous response to the tsunami

It’s 10 years this week since an earthquake measuring 9.1 on the Richter scale near the coast of Indonesia triggered the most destructive natural disaster in living memory. The quake’s mighty force sent a series of tsunamis rolling across the Indian Ocean at speeds of up to 800 kilometres an hour which devastated coastal communities across the region. The deluge hit 14 countries and affected 5 million people, killing an estimated 230,000 and leaving 1.7 million homeless…

 

10 years after Indian Ocean tsunami, Asia-Pacific region better prepared: UN

A fishing trawler damaged by the December 2004 tsunami under repairs at the Kudewella boat repair centre in Sri Lanka with assistance from FAO. Photo: FAO/Prakash Singh (file)

A fishing trawler damaged by the December 2004 tsunami under repairs at the Kudewella boat repair centre in Sri Lanka with assistance from FAO. Photo: FAO/Prakash Singh (file)

22 December 2014 – Ten years after the Indian Ocean tsunami hit South and Southeast Asia, countries in the region are better prepared to deal with tragedies, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) said today, while stressing that there is still room for improvement. “A decade later, while events marking the remembrance of the tsunami recall the human tragedy, FAO examines the lessons learned in mitigating damage to agricultural livelihoods, food security and nutrition wrought by such natural and climatic events,” said Hiroyuki Konuma, FAO Assistant Director-General and Regional Representative for Asia and the Pacific…

 

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