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Storm claimed lives of at least 21 people with authorities still attempting to verify information

Storm claimed lives of at least 21 people with authorities still attempting to verify information

Typhoon Hagupit: Images show Philippines villagers’ resilience as they return to devastation of tropical storm

At least 21 people have died after Typhoon Hagupit swept across the Philippines, as photographs emerge showing thousands of homes and businesses heavily damaged. Fearful of a repeat of the catastrophe of Super Typhoon Haiyan in November last year, which saw 7,300 people killed, the Philippine government evacuated thousands ahead of the storm, placing the army on alert and distributing food and medical supplies to remote areas…

 

No ‘Executive Action’ for Environmental Migrants

A resident of Tacloban in the Philippines surveys the damage after Typhoon Haiyan devastated the region in 2013. The storm displaced some 2 million people.

A resident of Tacloban in the Philippines surveys the damage after Typhoon Haiyan devastated the region in 2013. The storm displaced some 2 million people.

SAN FRANCISCO – As government officials and climate experts from around the world meet this week in Lima, Peru for a U.N. climate conference, tens of thousands worldwide have already been displaced by the effects of climate change. Some have remained within their country of origin, while others have fled across borders or even oceans. Experts on global migration patterns warn that while the number of cross-border “environmental migrants” is certain to grow, there remains little to no legal framework for absorbing them…

 

Media distortion and western bias – why do some disasters attract more cash?

A woman carries a bag of rice donated by USAid through a market in Leogane, Haiti, days after the 2010 earthquake. Photograph: Lynne Sladky/AP

A woman carries a bag of rice donated by USAid through a market in Leogane, Haiti, days after the 2010 earthquake. Photograph: Lynne Sladky/AP

Aid agencies jostle for public attention as they respond to humanitarian crises: natural disaster, war, famine and disease. The Disasters Emergency Committee, which comprises 14 British NGOs working internationally, has appeals open for Gaza and Ebola. Yet while its tsunami-earthquake appeal in 2004 raised £392m, its 2008 appeal for the Democratic Republic of the Congo generated only £10.5m. Why do some emergencies receive more support than others? We asked students to share their thoughts on the reasons behind funding imbalances and whether a fairer system was possible…

 

Bangladesh 6th on Women Resilience Index

© OECD

© OECD

Despite the country’s good reputation in facing disasters, Bangladeshi women are far behind in this regard Bangladesh was positioned sixth among the seven South Asian countries in the Women’s Resilience Index (WRI) on preparing for and recovering from disasters, said a report by the intelligence unit of UK-based weekly newspaper The Economist…

 

Campbell Hanan and why resilience is high on the agenda

Campbell Hanan: the majority of towns and cities where the bulk of the population lived had areas at high risk from natural disasters.

Campbell Hanan: the majority of towns and cities where the bulk of the population lived had areas at high risk from natural disasters.

Climate risk has become a key consideration for Investa following its involvement with the Australian Business Roundtable for Disaster Resilience and Safer Communities. Chief executive of Investa Office Fund Campbell Hanan said there were also broader lessons for the sector to learn regarding where to develop, with greater stringency required from local consent authorities to avoid the “groundhog day” of rebuilding the same things again and again in high-risk areas. Mr Hanan told The Fifth Estate the extreme weather events of the past five years were probably in a bizarre way an “ally” in bringing resilience to front of mind for the property sector and other industries…

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