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Mud from a landslide caused by flooding is seen in this aerial view of Afghanistan's Guzargah-e-Nur district of Baghlan province on June 9, 2014. Rescuers scrambled to deliver food and medical supplies to Afghan families marooned on mountaintops after flash floods killed 80 people in a remote northern district, washing away hundreds of homes and forcing thousands to flee. (Wakil Kohsar/AFP/Getty Images)

Mud from a landslide caused by flooding is seen in this aerial view of Afghanistan’s Guzargah-e-Nur district of Baghlan province on June 9, 2014. Rescuers scrambled to deliver food and medical supplies to Afghan families marooned on mountaintops after flash floods killed 80 people in a remote northern district, washing away hundreds of homes and forcing thousands to flee. (Wakil Kohsar/AFP/Getty Images)

Explainer: Why Do Landslides Happen and Why Are They So Devastating?

Landslides don’t attract the same media attention as more familiar geological hazards such as earthquakes and volcanoes. And yet they can be just as disastrous and, in fact, 2014 has been a particularly bad year. In Hiroshima, Japan, a series of landslides has left 39 people confirmed dead and a further 52 missing. In March a hillside collapsed in Washington state, US, leaving 43 dead, and in May massive mudslides in Afghanistan caused several thousand deaths. In early August, landslides in Nepal left almost 200 dead or missing…

 

Emergency Services Levy: Rise worries SA retirement village pensioners who might not be exempt

Photo: Pamela Judge said a rise was a lot of money to some older people

Photo: Pamela Judge said a rise was a lot of money to some older people

Residents of South Australia’s retirement villages are concerned they might not be exempt from a higher Emergency Services Levy (ESL). The State Government pledged at budget time to spare pensioners from a sharp rise to the ESL. The levy is often imposed on the retirement village rather than its individual residents and that might leave some people ineligible for pensioner remissions…

 

 

Global Centre for Disaster Resilience to move to Huddersfield

THE University of Huddersfield has become a key international centre for research which aims to ensure that communities, cities and countries around the world can resist and recover from natural and man-made disasters. The University’s School of Art, Design and Architecture is now home to the Huddersfield Centre for Disaster Resilience, headed by two experts who have established a global network of important collaborations. They are professors Dilanthi Amaratunga and Richard Haigh, who have relocated to Huddersfield from the University of Salford. Their expertise in the built environment has resulted in highly prestigious appointments such as leading roles in the United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction…

 

Learning about resilience in children – Bamboo Resilience Project

A study called the Bamboo Project on Child Resilience was carried out in Nepal, Bulgaria and Ethiopia and the findings came to fruition in 2014. The 257 children who participated in the research reported similar experiences, despite the different environments. “Children are not passive and submissive in the face of adversity,” said Professor Gilligan. “They actively search out positive actors in their own lives, be it through friends, brothers and sisters of their own age, or an adult.”..

 

Hiroshima’s Disaster, Climate Crisis, and the Future of the Resilient City

Hiroshima1Hiroshima City’s unprecedented extreme rain and multiple landslides of August 20 took over 70 lives and wrecked several districts. The disaster was big enough to stay in the international news cycle for a few days, in spite of a summer rife with epidemic Ebola as well as worsening economic, environmental, geopolitical and other crises. This article argues that Hiroshima merits a great deal more sustained attention, indeed that it should be deliberately made a turning point in studying climate change and urban resilience…

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