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These Engineers Are Fighting Bushfires with Explosives

Now a team of engineers believe that they can fight these fires by blasting them with explosive force...some believe John Wayne was there first...

Now a team of engineers believe that they can fight these fires by blasting them with explosive force…some believe John Wayne was there first…

Bushfires are one of the most deadly and destructive natural disasters in Australia — they can move at incredible speeds and wipe out a town in minutes. Now a team of engineers believe that they can fight these fires by blasting them with explosive force. In this video, you can see how it works. University of New South Wales engineer Graham Doig is researching how to use explosives in firefighting, and traveled to a New Mexico explosion research facility (yes, there is one) to conduct some experiments…

 

This Dinosaur Skeleton Proves The Biblical Flood Happened 4,300 Years Ago, Creation Museum Says

DinosaurA new exhibit of a 30-foot-long fossil skeleton of an Allosaurus, which resembles a Tyrannosaurus rex, is set to open at a Kentucky museum that asserts dinosaurs lived alongside humans a few thousand years ago. A release from Answers in Genesis, the Christian ministry that owns the Creation Museum, said about 50 percent of the skeleton’s bones were recovered when it was found in Colorado over a decade ago. Keeping with its Bible-themed approach, the Creation Museum says the dinosaur died in a worldwide flood about 4,300 years ago. Scientists say the last dinosaurs roamed the earth more than 60 million years ago…

 

Record rains made Australia a giant green global carbon sink

fitzroy-riverRecord-breaking rains triggered so much new growth across Australia that the continent turned into a giant green carbon sink to rival tropical rainforests including the Amazon, our new research shows. Published in the international journal Nature, our study found that vegetation worldwide soaked up 4.1 billion tons of carbon in 2011 – the equivalent of more than 40% of emissions from burning fossil fuels that year. Unexpectedly, the largest carbon uptake occurred in the semi-arid landscapes of Australia, Southern Africa and South America…

 

Tornadoes, large hail smack Colorado

A fierce weather system — featuring baseball-sized hail and multiple tornadoes — ripped through Colorado on Wednesday afternoon, spurring warnings to people in and around Denver to take cover. The frenzy was tied to a dangerous super cell thunderstorm that, in addition to heaps of hail, produced a number of twisters, according to storm chasers on the scene. The National Weather Service said there were reported tornado touchdowns in Watkins, East Denver, Aurora, Byers and Leader. One witness, Jeff Piotrowski, said shortly after 3 p.m. (5 p.m. ET) that he had personally seen five tornadoes on the ground not far from Denver International Airport…

 

Meteor Bonds. Oh Yes.

meteorWorst day ever: you get struck by a meteor and your bonds go down the tube. Yes, bonds that allow investors to bet against natural disasters have a new risk to wager on: meteor strikes. United Services Automobile Association, an insurer, is poised Thursday to issue the first ever catastrophe bond that will hinge in part on space rocks hitting the U.S.Catastrophe bonds, which are typically issued by insurers and can completely wipe out investors in the event of a disaster, usually provide insurers cover against calamities such as hurricanes. So if there are no disasters during the lifetime of the bond, investors get their money back, but if something bad happens, investors can potentially wave goodbye to their cash. While the risk of catastrophic meteorite damage might be remote, investors could also lose money on the USAA’s bond in the event of earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, wildfires and various storms and cyclones in any of the 50 U.S. states…

 

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