Resilience NEWS

6 Habits Of Resilient People

I’ve been more curious than ever about why some people persevere through trying circumstances while others begin flailing at the first sign of crisis. I wondered if there were commonalities among resilient people and whether it’s possible to develop those qualities and strong points. The answers, according to the experts, are yes and yes. Here’s what those never-say-die folks have in common–and how you can develop them for yourself…

pets in disasters

 

Pets Suffer in the Aftermath of Natural Disasters

Consider that more than 30 million animals resided in the path of Hurricane Sandy. More than 30,000 of those were lost, abandoned, or injured; many are still unclaimed and living in shelters. And in 2005, Hurricane Katrina left over 250,000 pets stranded and in need of care…

What You Should Know About the ‘Natural’ Disasters of 2013

According to CoreLogic’s 2013 Natural Hazard Risk Summary and Analysis, this past year saw a decrease in weather-related disasters. Dr. Thomas Jeffery, a senior scientist for CoreLogic, declared, “Many predicted that 2013 would be a record year of catastrophic destruction, but the number of natural disasters that typically cause widespread destruction, mainly hurricanes, wildfires and tornadoes, were far less than anticipated in comparison to last year’s record-setting hazard seasons” (emphasis added)…

Long-term Health Problems After Natural Disasters Strike

Courtland Robinson, a professor at the Center for Refugee and Disaster Response at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, says that when communities deal with natural disasters they deal with the emergency phase first. These are typically the images flashed across the TV screen immediately after a natural disaster has taken place. This phase is all about rescue and recovery Robinson explained. Doctors and aid workers “stabilize the health of the population with emergency interventions,” he says…

Radio calls for help before another natural disaster hits

THE Gladstone Amateur Radio Club knew after flooding last year that communications in the Boyne Valley were less than adequate during natural disasters. Approaching its first anniversary, the non-profit, community organisation is operating from the summit of Kroombit Tops to ensure residents can access alerts and assistance in the event of a repeat. The club relies on minimal funding and second-hand equipment to deliver a vital service to people living in rural areas…

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