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World Bank Says Natural Disasters Cost $3.8 Trillion Since 1980

Annual economic losses from natural disasters have almost quadrupled in the past three decades, the World Bank said in a report that recommends investments ranging from early-warning systems to safer roads and buildings. The average reported losses rose from around $50 billion a year in the 1980s to almost $200 billion a year in the past decade, totaling $3.8 trillion from 1980 to 2012, according to the report, which used data by Munich Re, the world’s largest reinsurer. Three-quarters of the total was due to extreme weather, it said. The report was released 10 days after one of the deadliest typhoons in Philippines history killed more than 3,600 and displaced hundreds of thousands of people. The report by the Washington-based bank urges a bigger role for “disaster resilience” planning in economic development…

 

“Resilience is not an add-on but an integral part of a city’s plan” Hence, resilience is greatly influenced by the quality of local management, its capacity to anticipate and enforce, the availability of information and the quality of the infrastructure . From: Urban Planning for City Leaders.

Resilience is not an add-on but an integral part of a city’s plan
Hence, resilience is greatly influenced by the quality of local management, its capacity to anticipate and enforce, the availability of information and the quality of the infrastructure . From: Urban Planning for City Leaders.

Building Resilience And Reducing Climate Risks In Cities

Resilience is not an add-on but an integral part of a city’s plan. It can only be achieved if all components of the complex urban system are taken into consideration. Therefore, instead of seeing vulnerability as an additional concern to be address with stand-alone efforts, cities will benefit from better integrating resilience into urban planning…

 

Patricia Casey: Resilience of Filipinos awes the world

The view that a nation, confronted by the loss of nearly 10,000 of its people and up to 800,000 displaced, should be resilient and strong, must seem unusual. In our culture the psychological impact of trauma generates a knee-jerk response – counselling is required, those affected are victims and the assistance provided will prevent mental health problems…

 

How And Where Should We Rebuild After Natural Disasters?

Sociologist Kathleen Tierney knows about disasters; she runs the Natural Hazards Center at the University of Colorado. She says for too long, people have followed the same pattern after a disaster. “Inevitably … there is this huge push to restore things, to put things back the way they were,” she says. ” ‘Let’s get back to business, let’s get people back in their homes,’ etc.” Should people instead retreat from the coast? Some did just that in Sri Lanka after the 2004 tsunami that killed 230,000 people around the Indian Ocean. “There was an effort to move settlements away from the shore,” says Tierney, “but the issue here is that people make their livelihood from the sea.”…

 

In Middle Ages, Societies Surprisingly Responsive To Natural Disasters

Our vision of medieval times is a world of violence and filth, when life, as Thomas Hobbes wrote, was “nasty, brutish, and short.” Imagine the chaos in that world when a natural disaster like an earthquake, a flood or famine struck. But, according to two British scientists, the societies between 1,000 and 1,500 A.D. were better organized than most people think, and actually employed some of the same techniques used today to survive or mitigate disasters, even if they didn’t always understand the causes…

 

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